Is Predictive Scheduling Coming To Connecticut?

In certain businesses where work volume cannot be known in advance, such as outdoor maintenance work that is dependent on the weather and delivery of materials, or service work that is dependent on the volume of customers, employers try to keep labor costs under control by using “call-in” or “just-in-time” scheduling; i.e., having employees call…

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March is Women’s History Month: A Look at 3 Laws Protecting the Rights of Women in the Workplace

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, nearly half of U.S. workers are women. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits sex discrimination in all aspects of employment, was enacted over 50 years ago, but women still face challenges in the workplace. As March is Women’s History Month, now is a…

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Latest Developments from the Connecticut General Assembly: March 8th Public Hearing

On Thursday, March 8, 2018, the General Assembly’s Labor and Public Employees Committee will conduct a public hearing on the following proposed bills, many of which concern “wage and hour” and leave issues: 1. H.B. No. 5387 AN ACT CONCERNING PAID FAMILY MEDICAL LEAVE. This bill would provide paid family and medical leave benefits to eligible…

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Second Circuit Rules That Title VII Prohibits Discrimination On The Basis Of Sexual Orientation

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals (the federal appellate court covering Connecticut, New York and Vermont), on Monday, February 26, 2018, issued a decision overturning its prior rulings and holding definitively that Title VII’s ban on “discrimination on the basis of sex” prohibits discrimination because of an employee’s sexual orientation. Connecticut state law has since…

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Is a Broken Arm a Disability?

In Connecticut, employees with disabilities are protected from discrimination by both the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and by the Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act (“CFEPA”). Some disabilities are obvious and permanent; for instance, no one would dispute that an amputated limb qualified as a disability under the law. However, employers are sometimes faced…

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They’re Back! What Should Employers Expect from the 2018 Connecticut General Assembly Session?

On February 7, the 2018 session of the Connecticut General Assembly began. The session is scheduled to adjourn on May 9, 2018. Numerous proposed bills affecting Connecticut employers and employees will be unleashed during the session, most of which will never see the light of day. The Labor and Public Employees Committee will be where…

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Connecticut Employers Have New Notification Requirement Beginning January 29

The Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act (CT FEPA) was amended during the past legislative session to enhance the protections available to pregnant women in the workplace. Among the new provisions of the law (which applies to employers of three or more employees as well as the state and political subdivisions) is the requirement that the…

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OSHA “Paper” Investigations

The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has broad power to inspect workplaces. Section 8 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act empowers OSHA inspectors “to enter without delay and at reasonable times any factory, plant, establishment, construction site” or other workplace.  Inspectors have the right to inspect and investigate during regular working hours and…

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Don’t Want to Be the Next 7-Eleven? Focus on I-9 Compliance

Immigration and Customs Enforcement has not been coy about the purpose of its January 10 raid on some one hundred independently-owned 7-Eleven franchises around the country. The agency’s press statement about the raid said specifically that the action was meant to “send a message to U.S. businesses.” An ICE official elaborated on that message in…

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The Critical Impact of Pretext in Employment Discrimination Cases

“I can’t believe you are firing me for ‘performance issues’. I received ‘exceeds expectations’ in all categories of my last five performance evaluations. You gotta be kidding me!” “I don’t understand why you denied me the promotion to assistant manager on the basis that I don’t have a college degree. None of the last three…

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When Does Work Constitute “Training” For Purposes Of Determining Whether An Intern Is Really An Employee?

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (which includes Connecticut) recently revisited the question of when an unpaid intern is actually an intern, as opposed to an employee. This time, the Court focused on whether the internship provided sufficient “training” to qualify as an internship even though the interns were often performing menial…

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USCIS to Rescind Work Authorization Rule for H-4 Spouses

On December 14, 2017, the Department of Homeland Security announced that it is preparing proposed regulations eliminating United States work authorization for certain holders of H-4 visas, a derivative visa classification that permits a member of an H-1B visa holder’s family to accompany him or her to the United States. The authorization in question was…

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BETTER LATE THAN NEVER: LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT EFFECTS OF THE STATE BUDGET “IMPLEMENTER”

While several bills were enacted earlier this year affecting Connecticut employers (see our post on them here), the 2017 regular session of the Connecticut General Assembly was not the final word. Due to the lack of a budget, the General Assembly had to convene a “special session.”  Finally, in late October, our long state nightmare…

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Paid Family Leave May Be Just Around the Corner

Although the Connecticut General Assembly was not particularly active in employment legislation– perhaps because of the protracted budget crisis– our neighboring State of New York adopted a major new employment entitlement this year: paid family leave. Commencing on January 1, 2018, most employees in New York State will be eligible to receive weekly benefit payments…

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