Supreme Court Decision on Departing Employees & Releasing Workers’ Compensation Claims Against Employer

The Connecticut Supreme Court recently released a decision, SC19085 that puts to bed an issue that frequently arises when employers attempt to have departing employees release ALL claims against the company – including workers’ compensation claims.  In Leonetti v. MacDermid, Inc., the employer and employee entered into a settlement agreement to pay the employee $70,000…

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Personnel Files, Random Drug Tests and FMLA Issues Examined at Connecticut Automotive Retailers Association Seminar

On October 29 and November 12, members of Pullman & Comley, LLC’s Labor, Employment Law and Employee Benefits Department presented an intensive seminar to the Connecticut Automotive Retailers Association.  Significant highlights included: Personnel Files:  Under the recent amendments to the Connecticut’s Personnel Files Act, Public Act No. 13-176, all employers need to be aware that…

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Don’t You Forget About Me! Mandatory Paid Sick Leave and Expiring Collective Bargaining Agreements

As you may recall, in 2011, Connecticut become the first state in the nation to enact mandatory paid sick leave legislation.  This mandatory paid sick leave law, which became effective January 1, 2012, required most public-sector employers with more than 50 employees – such as school boards and municipalities — and most non-manufacturing, private-sector employers…

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Anti-Raiding Agreements Can Cause Big Trouble For Employers

Recent developments in two California lawsuits confirm that employers take big risks if they agree with competitors not to recruit each other’s employees.  Apple, Google, eBay, Intuit, and other large technology companies face antitrust claims from both the U.S. Justice Department and employees arising from “handshake agreements” that may have been intended to call a…

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Supreme Court Hears Argument on Latest “Donning” and “Doffing” Wage Case

Yesterday, the United States Supreme Court heard argument in another “donning and doffing” case.  Donning and doffing refers to the need for employees to put on (“don”) and take off (“doff”) clothing as part of their job.  The last time the U.S. Supreme Court heard a donning and doffing case IBP v. Alvarez, et.al, 03-1238 …

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Be Careful – Complying with Separation Agreements and Personnel File Issues

Parties often include in separation agreements a confidentiality provision, along with a provision indicating that the agreement is not to be included in the soon-to be former employee’s personnel file. Sometimes, such provisions may end up being meaningless gestures, in light of the fact that such agreements may be susceptible to subpoenas and discovery requests…

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2013 Labor, Employment, Employee Benefits and Immigration Law Seminar Summary

      On October 30, 2013, Pullman & Comley, LLC’s Labor, Employment Law and Employee Benefits Department presented its annual seminar on labor, employment, employee benefits and immigration law issues at The Hartford Club in Hartford, Connecticut.     Highlights of the seminar included Attorney Andrew Glassman’s highly-informative discussion on the impact of legalized…

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Welcome to “Working Together”

Welcome to the Pullman & Comley Labor, Employment and Employee Benefits Law Blog, “Working Together,”  providing timely, substantive information on the constantly changing workplace laws affecting your employees and your business. The articles on this blog are authored by the attorneys in our Labor, Employment Law and Employee Benefits Department, each of whom brings individual…

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How Do You Win a Discrimination Case?

Obviously, the simple answer is to not discriminate.  But it also is important to have well-documented facts that support a business-related justification for the employer’s action and to demonstrate the plaintiff’s lack of proof of discrimination.  A discrimination lawsuit begins as little more than an accusation, and the court process moves slowly, but eventually a…

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Illinois Appellate Court Won’t Enforce Noncompetes Against At-Will Employees Unless the Employee Stays At Least Two Years: Implications for Connecticut Employers

You’re a Connecticut employer with a restrictive covenant program to protect your customer relationships and confidential business information.  You require anyone you hire who to develop customer relationships or use your confidential business information to sign reasonable noncompete/non-solicitation agreements at the beginning of employment.  You’re confident you’ve immunized yourself from a claim that the covenants…

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Connecticut Medical Marijuana Statute – Is It Sowing the Seeds of Employer Discontent?

With the enactment of Connecticut’s medical marijuana, Connecticut became the 17th State in the Union to pass legislation legalizing the use of pot in one way or another.  As of today, 20 states and the District of Columbia have enacted legislation and that number will likely continue to grow.  Connecticut has now approved comprehensive regulations…

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What’s Missing From Employee Handbooks?

Joshua Hawks-Ladds, chair of the Labor, Employment Law and Employee Benefits Department, was featured on JD Supra in an article about Employee Handbooks. The article titled “What’s the One Thing Missing from Most Employee Handbooks?” reviewed things employers typically overlook when developing employee handbooks. To view the complete article, please click here…

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