Topic: Uncategorized

Timing Issues in Employee Terminations

Deciding whether an employee should be terminated is a difficult decision, involving not only whether it is the right thing to do, but also whether it is the right time to do it. The appropriate personnel documentation to support a termination should be developed and shared with the employee well before the termination decision is…

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Connecticut District Court Rules That Employer Cannot Rescind Job Offer Because Of Medical Marijuana Use

Since Connecticut passed the Palliative Use of Marijuana Act (“PUMA”), employers have struggled with how to apply its anti-discrimination provisions in various workplace situations. This is especially confusing given that the use of marijuana, even for medicinal purposes, is still considered illegal under federal law.  This month, the U.S. District Court for Connecticut, in Noffsinger…

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THE OPIOID CRISIS IN CONNECTICUT: ARE EMPLOYERS RESPONDING EFFECTIVELY?

According to a recent New York Times article, many employers are struggling to respond to the current opioid epidemic. (The September 21, 2018 article, authored by Jenny Gold, is entitled “Workers Overdose on the Job, and Employers Struggle to Respond.”  Find it here.) The article indicates that a stunning 70 percent of employers reported that…

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New Guidance from State and Federal Courts for Employers Who Require Arbitration of Employment Disputes

There is an on-going debate in the field of employment discrimination law as to whether an employer can require an employee to take a discrimination claim to arbitration rather than filing a lawsuit. A recent decision of the Connecticut Superior Court at Hartford in the case of Grose v. Didi, LLC gives some guidance on…

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What Are the Limits of Reasonable Accommodation?

The Americans with Disabilities Act requires employers to make reasonable accommodations to the known mental or physical limitations of an otherwise qualified individual. The Act defines a qualified individual as someone who, with or without accommodation, “can perform the essential functions of the employment position that such individual holds or desires.”  Furthermore, the Act defines…

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Connecticut Court Declines to Apply Physician Non-Compete Statute Retroactively

A Connecticut superior court recently held that Connecticut’s statute limiting the noncompetition agreements by which Connecticut physicians may be bound, may not be applied retroactively. In the 2016 legislative session, the Connecticut legislature enacted Section 20-14p, which provides, among other things, that a non-competition agreement with a physician may not restrict the physician’s activities for…

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Gender Identity Bathroom Access – From Schools To The Workplace

As readers of our Education Law Notes blog are well aware, there has been a lot of focus on the rights of transgender students with respect to bathroom access in educational institutions under Title IX. The rights of transgender employees to utilize the bathroom matching their gender identity under Title VII, however, has received far…

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Latest Developments from the Connecticut General Assembly: February 9th Public Hearing (and wage/hour bills)

On Thursday, February 9, 2017 (weather permitting), the General Assembly’s Labor and Public Employees Committee will conduct a public hearing on the following proposed bills, many of which concern “wage and hour” issues: S.B. No. 13 AN ACT CONCERNING THE MINIMUM FAIR WAGE. This proposed bill would increase the minimum wage from the current $10.10/hour…

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Should You Allow Your Employees Time Off to Vote? Three Considerations for Connecticut Employers

Election Day is now less than two weeks away. While many states require employers to provide their employees with time off to vote, Connecticut is not one of them. Employers in the state should, however, keep the following considerations in mind: If you provide your employees with paid vacation, personal days or other paid time…

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Is the CHRO Expanding its Reach into Schools and Police Actions?

I recently attended a meeting where Charles Krich, the Principal Attorney for the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (“CHRO”), spoke about the future of the agency.  Attorney Krich stated that the agency is seeking to become a more active “civil rights agency” and is expanding its reach beyond the landlord-tenant and employer-employee relationships…

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Articles Recently Written by Our Attorneys

Our attorneys Rachel Ginsburg, Megan Carannante and Zach Schurin have articles in this week’s Connecticut Law Tribune that are likely of interest to our readers. Rachel and Megan’s article “Sifting Through the Weeds: Medical Marijuana Law Has Implications for Employers” can be found at the link above.  This insightful article discusses the conflicts Connecticut new…

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