Monthly Archives: December 2017

When Does Work Constitute “Training” For Purposes Of Determining Whether An Intern Is Really An Employee?

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (which includes Connecticut) recently revisited the question of when an unpaid intern is actually an intern, as opposed to an employee. This time, the Court focused on whether the internship provided sufficient “training” to qualify as an internship even though the interns were often performing menial…

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USCIS to Rescind Work Authorization Rule for H-4 Spouses

On December 14, 2017, the Department of Homeland Security announced that it is preparing proposed regulations eliminating United States work authorization for certain holders of H-4 visas, a derivative visa classification that permits a member of an H-1B visa holder’s family to accompany him or her to the United States. The authorization in question was…

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BETTER LATE THAN NEVER: LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT EFFECTS OF THE STATE BUDGET “IMPLEMENTER”

While several bills were enacted earlier this year affecting Connecticut employers (see our post on them here), the 2017 regular session of the Connecticut General Assembly was not the final word. Due to the lack of a budget, the General Assembly had to convene a “special session.”  Finally, in late October, our long state nightmare…

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Paid Family Leave May Be Just Around the Corner

Although the Connecticut General Assembly was not particularly active in employment legislation– perhaps because of the protracted budget crisis– our neighboring State of New York adopted a major new employment entitlement this year: paid family leave. Commencing on January 1, 2018, most employees in New York State will be eligible to receive weekly benefit payments…

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Unpaid Disciplinary Suspensions Require a Careful Reading of Federal and State Law

Counseling and written warnings are common steps employers take to address employee attendance issues (such as habitual tardiness) or performance issues (such as failing to complete assigned work on time). But what if the employer is faced with an employee who engages in serious workplace misconduct, such as sexual harassment or violence? As recent news…

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