Monthly Archives: May 2015

The Basic Steps for an Employer to Comply with the Uniformed Services Leave Act

Since the law has been on the books for over a decade, most employers know that employees serving in our armed services who are called to active or reserve duty are entitled to job reinstatement, within certain parameters, once that service is complete. That law is, of course, the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights…

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Bad News, Good News: Disability Discrimination Plaintiff Sometimes Need Not Show He Was Qualified, But May Never Recover Punitive Damages

In a decision to be officially released on May 19, 2015, the Connecticut Appellate Court has addressed two interesting issues in the state law of employment discrimination, one of which is of considerable importance (and comfort) to employers. First, the court identified a relatively unusual situation in which a plaintiff claiming that he was discriminated…

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Timing and Consistency in Employee Discipline

A recent case decided by the Connecticut Appellate Court illustrates the importance of timing and consistency in administering employee discipline. In Barbee v. Sysco Connecticut, LLC, an opinion released on April 28, 2015, the plaintiff, a 16-year employee, was a supervisor who processed returns at a wholesale food distributor’s warehouse.  According to the plaintiff, it…

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City of Waterbury v. Connecticut Alliance of City Police — A New Standard of Impartiality for Arbitrators in Interest Arbitrations?

The Superior Court’s decision in City of Waterbury v. Connecticut Alliance of City Police, could mark the emergence of a new standard of impartiality for party-selected arbitrators in Municipal Employee Relations Act [“MERA”] interest arbitrations.  In the decision, Superior Court Judge Brazzel-Massaro disqualified a union attorney from sitting on a MERA interest arbitration panel after the…

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