Monthly Archives: February 2014

What is the Appropriate Punishment for Actual and Perceived Threats in the Workplace?

Employers increasingly are concerned about threats to safety in the workplace.  At the same time, employers must be aware of the rights of any  employee accused of wrongdoing.  For a discussion of a recent case highlighting this tension, please visit Education Law Notes.…

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Latest Developments from the Connecticut General Assembly

The General Assembly’s Labor and Public Employees Committee will be having its next public hearing on Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 1:00 PM in Room 1E of the Legislative Office Building. The Committee will consider the following bills: Senate Bill. No. 219 (RAISED), AN ACT CONCERNING THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT SYSTEM CONTRIBUTION RATE.  This bill…

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“Mind Your Own Business”- The Connecticut Supreme Court Limits Challenges to Licensing and Certification Decisions by Public Agencies in Lopez v. Bridgeport Board of Education.

In a much ballyhooed case, certain residents and taxpayers of the City of Bridgeport brought a “quo warranto” action in the courts, challenging the qualifications of the City’s Superintendent of Schools (Paul Vallas) to hold his position, due to a failure to have the appropriate certification for a Connecticut school superintendent.  Vallas came to the…

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2014 Labor, Employment, Employee Benefits and Immigration Law Seminar

As part of Pullman & Comley’s ongoing seminar series addressing the latest legal developments affecting employers and the workplace, we are pleased to announce that our Spring Seminar will be held this year on Friday, March 14 in Norwalk. Topics will include: The Affordable Care Act: What Employers Need to Know Now The DOL’s “Misclassification…

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Hear No Evil; See No Evil: The General Corporate Knowledge Presumption

In a previous post, we discussed the importance of Kwan v. The Andalex Group LLC, – F.3d – (2d Cir. 2013) as it related to the likelihood of obtaining summary judgment on Title VII retaliation claims in the aftermath of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Nassar decision, which seemingly raised the employee’s standard of proof of…

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What Can We Expect from this Connecticut General Assembly Session?

 On February 6, 2014, the 2014 session of the Connecticut General Assembly began.  Since this is an election year, the session will be relatively short, with adjournment scheduled for May 7, 2014.   We can expect a plethora of proposed bills affecting Connecticut employers and employees that will be unleashed during the session, most of which…

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Good Cop or Bad Cop: The Public’s Right to Know

As you may have learned through media reports or your favorite television cop show,  allegations of misdeeds by police officers usually proceed through a police department’s “Internal Affairs” [“IA”] investigation process.  In today’s world, it is not surprising that journalists and members of the public may want to have access to these IA records and…

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What is a Workday?

Connecticut has an interesting statute, Conn. Gen. Stat. 31-21, which declares that “eight hours of labor performed in any one day by any one person shall be a legal day’s work unless otherwise agreed.”  But what is the meaning of a ‘legal day’s work,” and does it restrict employers and employees who would like to…

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Employee or Independent Contractor? – If You Have the Right to Control Them, They’re Yours

When we analyze the question whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor, we usually approach the issue from the point of view of the Connecticut Department of Labor and apply the “ABC” test, or from the point of view of another government agency (i.e., the IRS or the USDOL) and apply the…

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